Tag: history

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Washington D.C., The Bluegrass Capitol – The Story of…

There are not so many documentations about Bluegrass available. This is a high quality  24 minute video about Bluegrass in Washington, D. C.

Washington D.C., The Bluegrass Capitol – The Story of Bluegrass in Washington, D.C.

I created this video when I was in graduate school pursuing an MFA in film. I have been working on a feature length documentary on The Seldom Scene for several years (I submitted a cut of it as my MFA thesis project) and for this project I interviewed Mike Auldridge (again), Dudley Connell (again), George McCeney, and Len Holslcaw. I will be uploading a few clips from my Seldom Scene documentary in progress over the next few days. With the recent passing of Mike Auldridge, I remembered countless conversations with Mike over the last twenty years or so and the three times I interviewed him on camera. I shot this interview with Mike in April 2004 and it is my favorite interview with Mike. He truly was what everyone has said he was– a true gentleman and a class act all the way. And thanks to Dudley Connell, Len Holsclaw and George McCeney as well.

More videos about Bluegrass History

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The Italian Mandolin: Its Evolution, Nomenclature and Types –…

Alex Timmerman has compiled a poster with the most important Italian mandolin models. He has asked me to help to share this poster.

On this poster you can find mandolins that have been built between 1650 and 1927. You can follow the evolution of the different models, the models are arranged according to the years when a model was built.

I have split up the picture to give you an impression of the poster, you can download the complete picture in good quality from the website of Alex Timmerman.

 

Download PDF from Alex Timmermans Website

Read also:

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Orville Gibson and the Gibson Mandolin and Guitar Company…

The Gibson Mandolin and Guitar Company has very much influenced the history of the mandolin in the USA. Orville Gibson had developed his very special mandolin models during the last decades of the 19th century. In 1902 he sold the patents for his mandolins to some businessmen who then founded the Gibson mandolin and guitar company.

The mandolin models designed by Orville Gibson and the models that the Gibson company designed from those models – the F model with the scroll and the A model – have almost completely replaced the typical Italian bowlback models during the following years.

I have compiled some videos about Orville Gibson in my playlist:

Playliste Orville Gibson

  • CES 2014: Orville Gibson’s Workbench
  • The Ballad Of Orville Gibson
  • George Gruhn on the Orville Gibson Mandolin IBMA 2008
  • Gibson Guitars at CES 2014

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC878J8mcBo-XHpPdT0e_J9DhTFqR6AkY

Tim May and David Harvey have presented their collection of vintage Gibson instruments in the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, those videos are contained in the following playlist:

Playlist – Vintage Gibson

A closer look at instruments used in mandolin orchestras in the early 20th Century…. Acoustic superpickers Tim May and David Harvey brought out their personal vintage Gibson colllections at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum on June 27, 2007, for one powerful demonstration of the enduring quality of these old treasures. www.timmaymusic.net www.davidharveymusic.com

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7244B5A154C7E30D

Articles and more sources about Orville Gibson

 

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The History of the American Guitar – Great Resource…

The American acoustic guitar is certainly the most important instruments in Folk, Country, Bluegrass and Americana music. Although the mandolin and the banjo were very popular for some time in history the guitar has made the race.

If you are interested how the American guitar became what it is today and who were the builders and players of the early American guitar you should visit the website

The Unstrung History of the American Guitar: The Guitar and 19th Century American Music

Welcome to The Unstrung History of the American Guitar!

The guitar is the voice of American popular music. How it got to be that way has a lot to do with Alpine yodelers, blackface minstrels and your great great grandmother. The blues and “hillbilly” string band music are the immediate ancestors of country music, R&B and rock & roll, but the guitar juggernaut that streaked through the twentieth century, and still is going strong in the twenty-first, was launched before the Civil War in urban parlors and on New York stages.

Join us for an excursion through the neglected nineteenth century, when “guitar fever” first seized America.

Mandoline
Mandoline aus einem alten Katalog

The first part deals with the guitar and the American music. Influences from Mexican music, the role of the banjo and the mandolin, the guitar in Ragtime, Jazz and Hillbilly music are discussed. Very interesting is also that for some time the Yodel music from the Swiss Alps which was usually also accompanied by guitars was very popular in the USA.

The Guitar and American Music

  • The Guitar and the Birth of American Music
  • A Rage For the Guitar
  • Professional Guitarists in Antebellum America
  • Mexico and the American West
  • Banjos, Mandolins, Minstrels and Medicine Shows
  • Ragtime, Jazz, Hillbilly and the Blues
Monarch Guitar aus einem alten Katalog
Monarch Guitar aus einem alten Katalog

The second chapter informs about the builders and developers of the guitar. You can read about C. F. Martin and other makers of his time – Lyon & Healy, Oscar Schmidt, Harmony and Orville Gibson. The following topics are the changes in the design of the guitar, the first steel strings and the harp-guitars. A guitar gallery shows some interesting instruments from the 19th century.

Guitars and Guitar Makers of the 19th Century

  • C.F. Martin and His Contemporaries ( 7 Articles )
  • The Gilded Age ( 9 Articles )
  • Guitar Design and Technology ( 3 Articles )
  • Guitar Gallery ( 11 Articles )
Banjo
Banjo aus einem alten Instrumentenkatalog

The next chapter presents ca. 40 guitarists of the 19th century – concert guitarists, guitarists in vaudeville and minstrel shows, singers and jazz guitarists.

19th Century American Guitarists

  • Concert Guitarists and Teachers ( 23 Articles )
  • Minstrel Theatre, Medicine Shows and Vaudeville ( 12 Articles )
  • Songsters and Jazzmen ( 5 Articles )

A link collection is helpful if you are looking for more information about the American guitar and guitarists in the USA.

I have found the following video in which a guitar made around 1850 is beeing played:

Jake Wildwood – Improvisation on 19th Century Guitar

Here’s a c.1850s parlor guitar (would have been called ‘concert’ back then) that’s most likely either American built trying to copy Martin’s early guitars (body shape, body shape!) or European built trying to copy an early Martin. Either way, it’s a truly beautiful guitar with an excellent spruce top, flamed maple back and sides (all solid, of course) and interesting features like a thick brass saddle, single pearl dot on the 5th fret, lovely soundhole rosette, and impeccable, balanced tone.

My recommendation – A great book about the American Guitar:

Inventing the American Guitar: The Pre-Civil War Innovations of C.F. Martin and His Contemporaries (Amazon partnerlink)