Tag: historical recordings

historical recordings

Sivio Ranieri – Historical Mandolin Recordings

Recently Ralf Leenen and Alex Timmermann have added some interesting youtube videos about the life and music of Silvio Ranieri.

Silvio Ranieri – Historical Postcard (ca. 1932)

Ralf Leenen plays a historical record played by Silvio Ranieris mandolin orchestra on an original grammophone from the 1920s.

In a Chinese Teple Garden, by Ketelbey and En Badinant by Ambrosio

In a second video Ralf Leenen talks about the mandolin method by S. Ranieri and his connections with Ranieri.

The 3rd video you can hear a solo recording by Ranieri of The Swan by Camille Saint-Saens with piano accompaniment. In this video Ralf Leenen also analyses the playing of Ranieri which is very interesting.

Alex Timmermann has also added a youtube video about Silvio Ranieri including historical recordings of Sérenade badine by J. Gabriel.Marie, Arlequinade by Louis Ganne, Intermezzo from ‘Cavalleria Rusticana’ by Pietro Mascagni.

A sound video of a recording on a 78 RPM disk made in 1905 with music for Mandolin and Piano by Jean Gabriel-Marie and Louis Ganne performed by the Italian Mandolin virtuoso Silvio Ranieri, as well as a 78 RPM recording of Pietro Mascagni’s famous Intermezzo ‘Cavalleria Rusticana’ played by The Belgian Mandolin Orchestra (the Mandolin section of the ‘Grande Harmonie Royale Bruxelles) conducted by Silvio Ranieri (Rome, 1882 – 1956, Bruxelles).

Additional Information

IMSLP sheet music for En Badinant by Ambrosio

IMSLP sheet music In a Chinese Temple Garden by Ketelbey

IMSLP sheet music Le Carneval des Animaux by C. Saint-Saens

Sheet music for Sérenade badine by J. Gabriel-Marie (for clarinet)

Youtube channel Ralf Leenen

Backside of postcard with signature by Silvio Ranieri
bluegrass

Red Allen und Frank Wakefield – Bluegrass 1964

I have recently found an interview with David Grisman (Live on the Jake Feinberg Show) where he talked about the recording of the Bluegrass Album with Red Allen and Frank Wakefield in 1964. He later talks about his projects with Jerry Garcia.

This interview inspired me to look back to the early 1960s and how Bluegrass was like then.

The album was produced for Smithsonian Folkways Records. Grisman (born in 1945) was just 19 years old when he produced this record. Wakefield had a great influence to Grisman who says the he learned alle tha mandolin solos a played by Frank Wakefield.

Smithsonian Folkways about Red Allen & Frank Wakefield

Allen and Wakefield’s music ranges from strictly traditional songs like “Little Maggie” to pieces introduced by Bill Monroe to sacred material, all with their hallmark close harmonies and tight instrumental backing. Like Monroe and Roscoe Holcomb, Allen’s voice embodies the “high lonesome” sound.

Grisman had invited Red Allen and Frank Wakefield to play a concert at the Carnegie Hall before.

Bluegrass (1964) – Red Allen und Frank Wakefield

David Grisman especially was inspired by a song from the album “Mountain Music Bluegrass Style” – The White House Blues by Earl Taylor and the Stoney Mountain Boys. They had to drive to New York to buy records like this. He says abou when he listened to this song for the very first time: “That changed my life”

White House Blues

Album – Mountain Music Bluegrass Style (Smithsonian)

David Grisman Interview Live on the Jake Feinberg Show

Wikipedia about Red Allen

Red Allen – Bluegrass Hall of Fame

WDON Recordings from Frank Wakefield and Red Allen

favorite tunes

Ernesto Becucci – The famous waltz “Tesoro Mio” and…

Ernesto Becucci (1845 – 1905) was a popular and succesful Italian composer during the second half of the 19th century. Especially his composition “Tesoro Mio” has been successful all over the world.

His compositions have also been arranged for mandolin and mandolin orchestra. In the monthly reports about published music (Hofmeisters Monatsberichte) from 1906 I have found a note about the composition “Erhaschte Küsse Op. 294” in a version for mandolin solo or with piano or guitar accompaniment:

a224-becucci

The composition “Che Ridere!” played by the mandolin ensemble “Mutinae Plectri” can be seen in the following video:

I have also found a historical recording with Troise and his Mandoliers (Selecta Plectrum Orchestra), a recording of  “Che ridere” by the Ensemble Ansamblul “ANIMO” from Moldavia and another version of “Tesoro Mio” with mandolins, mandocello and guitar (sheet music for this arrangement can be found in the Mandolin Cafe forum – see below).

There are many other versions with piano, accordion, carouselorgan or with bigger orchestras.

I have compiled compositions by Ernesto Becucci in the following playlist – enjoy the music by Ernesto Becucci!

Playlist Ernesto Becucci

Additional Information and Sheet Music

This is a well-known Italian waltz, originally written in 1895 for piano and adapted to many other settings over the following century. The original piano score is at IMSLP and there are many recordings, old and new, on Youtube. Pasquale Troise recorded it at one of his very first Decca sessions around 1929/30 (Link) with his Selecta Plectrum Mandoline Orchestra, shortly to be renamed “Troise & His Mandoliers”.

Becucci was a popular composer of the day and this is his best-known tune. He was a contemporary of Carlo Munier in Florence, and Munier dedicated his Duettino I to Becucci.

My recording is based on an arrangement for two mandolins and guitar published around 1910/20 by A. Paolilli’s Music Co., Providence R.I., and uploaded by Sheri in her Dropbox thread. I have recorded the original mandolin parts on vintage Italian bowlback mandolins, and have added a mandocello bass line to the guitar rhythm.

You can also find a number of free sheet music downloads for piano in the French National Library bnf:

Another compostion can be found on the site of James Garber:

Sheet music by Becucci from the Nakano library

historical recordings

Troise and his Mandoliers / Banjoliers – Historical Mandolin…

Pasquale Troise (1895 – 1957) was born in Naples in 1895. He came to Great Britan during the 1920, first as a member of the London Radio Dance Band, but soon founded his own orchestra, the Selecta Plectrum Mandoline Orchestra, which was later renamed to Troise and his Mandoliers. When the banjo became more popular than the mandolin (mainly because it was louder) the orchestra replaced the mandolins by banjos and played as Troise and his Banjoliers. The orchestra existed from the 1930s until 1957 directed by Troise, and continued until the early 1970s then conducted by Jack Mandel.

The orchestra did regularly appear in a radio broadcast named “Music while you work”. The history of Troise and his Mandoliers can be found on the website Masters of Melody. There you can also listen to two complete recordings of the broadcasts from 1956 and 1964. It is also interesting to read that some important classical mandolin players including Hugo d’Alton played with Troise and his Mandoliers.

Their personnel changed very little over the years — classical mandoline player Hugo D’Alton, Billy Bell and Terry Walsh were all there to ensure stability, with accordionist Emile Charlier or Albert Delroy and pianists such as William Davies and Sidney Davey.

Many recordings and also movies (filmed by British Pathe between 1932 and 1940 ) with Troise and his Mandoliers are also available at youtube, I have compiled everything that I have found in the following playlist:

Playlist Troise and his Mandoliers

Additional Information

Website about Troise and his Banjoliers

Wikipedia about “Music while you work”

Discussion in the Mandolin Cafe about Troise and the Mandoliers

Wikipedia about Angy Palumbo who was a member of Troise and hia Mandoliers

Palumbo was a specialist of various fretted instruments, and his advertisements in the trade journal B.M.G. shows that he taught guitar as well as banjo, mandolin and violin playing.[1] He himself also played several of these instruments as a member of “Troise and his Mandoliers”, a band led by fellow Italian immigrant Pasqual Troise (1895–1957). This band recorded frequently and also made regular radio appearances.[2]

The Wikipedia article contains a link to a PDF version of an interesting article about Angy Palumbo by the B. M. G.

German article about Troise and his Mandoliers

Troise And His Mandoliers – 78 RPM – Discography

The Tommy Douse Mandoliers

Written by Brian on The Tommy Douse Mandoliers were formed in 1940 and entertained audiences in and around the North East of England until 1980.

Article about Bernard Sheaff on the zitherbanjo website

During the 40’s and early 50s Mr. Sheaff’s main occupation was composing and arranging for professional fretted instrument bands; in particular, Troise and His Mandoliers (and Banjoliers), the Troise Novelty Orchestra, the Serenaders, etc.