Laurindo Almeida – The Master of the Brazilian Guitar

Laurindo Almeida was a Brazilian guitarist who was active in the USA after 1940. He worked in Hollywood as a studio musician and has played the guitar part in many movies. For his record Girl von Ipanema he won a Grammy in 1964. Laurindo Almeida is also seen as the father of the Bossa-Nova. He played together with the Modern Jazz Quartet, but he has also arranged many classical works for the guitar.

I had several books with sheet music by Laurindo Almeida for years, and I have recently worked on some of the pieces. Almeida arranged some famous Jazz Standards for the classical guitar, like Blue Moon,Over the Rainbow, Mamselle, My Funny Valentine – some great arrangements for guitar.

This is an English Air by Almeida in my version. I have found other videos of this tune which obviously play it from a different score which contains some errors. I think that my version must be the original version of this piece.

 

 

I have recently compiled youtube videos with recordings by Laurindo Almeida and Works composed or arranged by Almeida and played by other guitarist in two large playlists.

Playlist 1 – Original Recordings by Laurindo Almeida

Playlist 2 – Works by Laurindo Almeida played by other Guitarists

Additional Information

You can download a one hour podcast on the website of Fabio Zanon

More Links

 

You can find several editions of Almeidas works for the guitar. This is a large compilation of solo works which might be a good edition to start with (Amazon partnerlink):

 

 

The Mandolin Symposium 2015

Videos from the Mandolin Symposium 2015 have been made available in the youtube channel  Mandotunes.

The videos form the Friday night concert include teacher performances with Mike Marshall, Caterina Lichtenberg, Don Stiernberg, Sharon Gilchrist, Dudu Maia, Rich del Grosso, Roland White, Mike Mullins and the different student ensembles.

The playlist does also include videos of the Brazilian Choro group Choro das Tres and the Ragtime Skedaddlers who performed at the Mandolin Symposium 2015.

Playlist Mandolin Symposium 2015

Website Mandolin Symposium: Mandolin Symposium

Vieni sul Mar – A Great Italian Folk Tune for Mandolin or Guitar

Some time ago I have compiled a playlist with my favorite versions of the Italian folk song Vieni sul mar. This song has been popular for a long time, there are historical recordings from the early 20th century, Oscar Aleman recorded a great Jazz version of this song, and Andre Rieu played this for thousands of listeners in an open air TV show.

This is a great folk song to play on the mandolin, mandolin with guitar or with a complete mandolin ensemble. The song was also very popular in the Netherlands as Twee ogen zo blauw. And this song is also very popular in Japan.

There is another song closely related to Vieni sul mar, in English it’s titled Two lovely black eyes. This song has a different first part, but uses the same chorus.

Playlist Vieni sul Mar / Twee ogen zo blauw / Two lovely black eyes

Sheet music

Sheet music for Two lovely black eyes! Two Lovely Black Eyes!

Discussion

An discussion about the origin of this song in the Mandolin Cafe, including free sheet music for mandolin ensemble:

Links

My Vieni sul Mar link collection at pinboard.in

 

Troise and his Mandoliers / Banjoliers – Historical Mandolin Orchestra Recordings

Pasquale Troise (1895 – 1957) was born in Naples in 1895. He came to Great Britan during the 1920, first as a member of the London Radio Dance Band, but soon founded his own orchestra, the Selecta Plectrum Mandoline Orchestra, which was later renamed to Troise and his Mandoliers. When the banjo became more popular than the mandolin (mainly because it was louder) the orchestra replaced the mandolins by banjos and played as Troise and his Banjoliers. The orchestra existed from the 1930s until 1957 directed by Troise, and continued until the early 1970s then conducted by Jack Mandel.

The orchestra did regularly appear in a radio broadcast named “Music while you work”. The history of Troise and his Mandoliers can be found on the website Masters of Melody. There you can also listen to two complete recordings of the broadcasts from 1956 and 1964. It is also interesting to read that some important classical mandolin players including Hugo d’Alton played with Trois and his Mandoliers.

Their personnel changed very little over the years — classical mandoline player Hugo D’Alton, Billy Bell and Terry Walsh were all there to ensure stability, with accordionist Emile Charlier or Albert Delroy and pianists such as William Davies and Sidney Davey.

Many recordings and also movies (filmed by British Pathe between 1932 and ) with Troise and his Mandoliers are also available at youtube, I have compiled everything that I have found in the following playlist:

Playlist Troise and his Mandoliers

Additional Information

Website about Troise and his Banjoliers

Wikipedia about “Music while you work”

Discussion in the Mandolin Cafe about Troise and the Mandoliers

Wikipedia about Angy Palumbo who was a member of Troise and hia Mandoliers

Palumbo was a specialist of various fretted instruments, and his advertisements in the trade journal B.M.G. shows that he taught guitar as well as banjo, mandolin and violin playing.[1] He himself also played several of these instruments as a member of “Troise and his Mandoliers”, a band led by fellow Italian immigrant Pasqual Troise (1895–1957). This band recorded frequently and also made regular radio appearances.[2]

The Wikipedia article contains a link to a PDF version of an interesting article about Angy Palumbo by the B. M. G.

German article about Troise and his Mandoliers

Troise And His Mandoliers – 78 RPM – Discography

The Tommy Douse Mandoliers

Written byBrianonThe Tommy Douse Mandoliers were formed in 1940 and entertained audiences in and around the North East of England until 1980.

Article about Bernard Sheaff on the zitherbanjo website

During the 40’s and early 50s Mr. Sheaff’s main occupation was composing and arranging for professional fretted instrument bands; in particular, Troise and His Mandoliers (and Banjoliers), the Troise Novelty Orchestra, the Serenaders, etc.

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